GPS: More About GeoSetter

by JL Beeken on 11-27-2010

GeoSetterNeedless to say, my personal GPS co-ordinates are a little fuzzy these days. It’s now been over three months since my computer crashed, i.e. since life was hunkered down in a predictable groove. The temperature was about 75 F and I wasn’t wearing undershirts yet.

In the meantime, one of the things I’ve been doing to entertain myself is looking up GPS co-ordinates for my photographs. I now have 81 sets in my Location Favorites spanning six countries. Since my Skype subscription is only $3/month I can phone old people anywhere in the world and bug them until they talk to me. I figure any photo with a building in it has co-ordinates. I’m just kidding. Don’t do that to old people.

If you haven’t tried GeoSetter yet, you really should. If you’re still working in Picasa, this will take the important stuff up a notch. Using GeoSetter means you’ll have ExifTool running the IPTC which means you’ll have the best there is on the planet. And you can learn how to annotate your photos properly so all my harping on and on about it is not in vain. It also has Google Maps embedded so you can add your co-ordinates and view co-ordinates you already have embedded.

GeoSetter

GeoSetter

One of the great parts of GeoSetter is that you can create a Location Favorites list for addresses including the co-ordinates and even the Altitude. It looks up those things for you when you give it an address, or if you already have them you can paste them in. If they’re already there from other software they’ll show up automatically (perhaps depending on your previous software.) It was really interesting to find out that I once stayed in a bed & breakfast for two weeks that was only 6 feet above sea level. I think that’s cutting it a little too close.

Below the map is the Search box.

Searching Co-ordinates, GeoSetter

Type in an address and it will jump to that location on the map and give you back the co-ordinates in two different formats. You can move the pin around to find your exact spot. Then you can also add the co-ordinates, as well as the address details, to your Location Favorites using the Add/Edit button. The Location Favorites can be used to batch assign addresses and co-ordinates and it saves time.

Another good thing is that you can save all your GeoSetter settings as a smalll zip folder, including Location Favorites as an xml file. I did it backwards with a spreadsheet. This is much easier. If you’re really ambitious, and can think of a reason why, you can import xml files into Excel. If you’re not doing anything else in the middle of the night and you’re bored.

As you’ve heard ad nauseam, my father’s side is from around Sandusky. After collecting a few favorite locations I can have them all show up on the map at once. Clicking on a star will bring up a box of information about that location. Of course, as historians, we love this sort of thing because we can see locations and events in relation to each other.

Favorites on Map, GeoSetter

If you have two monitors, the various parts of the program are un-dockable so you can drag them around to make more room.

GeoSetter does much more complicated things with maps but I haven’t learned that part yet.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Geoff Coupe 11-28-2010 at 2:20 AM

Glad to see you like Geosetter… Re your comment about staying in a B&B that was only 6 feet above sea-level, I lived in Gouda for twenty years, and that’s 20 feet below sea-level. That fact was part of the reason for our move to the Achterhoek in The Netherlands for our twilight years. Here we’re all of 61 feet above sea-level.

Reply

JL 11-28-2010 at 2:35 AM

Geoff – glad to see you’re still kicking. It’s been so quiet over at your blog lately. I thought you’d taken a permanent holiday after our marathon sessions.

I now live at 2,100 feet above sea level. One of these days we have to talk about the Netherlands, before the whole place falls under the ocean. I believe that’s where my Beeken ancestors are from. Perhaps I could talk you into going grave-hunting? and thereby turn you into a bona fide genealogist.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Powered by sweetCaptcha


Previous post:

Next post: